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A Bibliometric Analysis of Top-Cited Journal Articles Related to Neuromodulation for Chronic Pain

Published:September 30, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neurom.2022.08.452

      Abstract

      Objectives

      Since its foundation in the 1960s, neuromodulation has become an increasingly used treatment option for chronic pain. This bibliometric analysis examines the most cited research in this field with the aim of uncovering existing trends and future directions.

      Materials and Methods

      Clarivate’s Web of Science data base was searched for the top 25 most cited studies focusing on neuromodulation for chronic pain. Various bibliometric parameters were then extracted and analyzed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were compared with non-RCTs.

      Results

      The top 25 articles had a mean of 347 citations and 22.2 citations per year, with more recent articles having a higher citation rate. Most were published in the last two decades and predominantly originated from the United States. There were 13 RCTs, which were significantly more recent (p = 0.004) and more cited per year (p = 0.001) than the 12 non-RCTs. Sources included 15 journals with a mean impact factor of 13.896. The most studied modality was spinal cord stimulation with 20 articles (76.9%), followed by intrathecal drug delivery (15.4%), dorsal root ganglion stimulation (3.8%), and peripheral nerve stimulation (3.8%).

      Conclusions

      Analysis of the most cited articles on neuromodulation reveals a focal shift from historical reports to innovative RCTs that have increasingly guided pain practice in the recent years. As novel techniques and technologies continue to develop, high-quality evidence coupled with broadening indications will likely direct further expansion of this field.

      Keywords

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